Colorado Cross-Disability Coalition 2011-2012 Annual Report

 OUR MISSION

CCDC advocates for social justice for people with all types of disabilities.

Colorado Cross-Disability Coalition (CCDC), came into being after President Bush signed the Americans with Disabilities Act into law in 1990. CCDC was established in order to ensure that people with disabilities in Colorado had the opportunity to live a better life and that ADA fulfilled the intention articulated by President Bush which was to break down the shameful wall of exclusion. We are the only statewide organization run by and for people with all types of disabilities. Cross-disability means that we believe people with different kinds of disabilities (e.g. mobility, wheelchair user, chronic illness, mental illness, cognitive or developmental, blind, Deaf, etc) have more in common than not and that we accomplish more through mutual assistance. 


Our Letter to Allies and Advocates for All People with Disabilities

Photo of Julie Reiskin and Lloyd Lewis

 

 

 

 

 

Dear Friends:

Colorado Cross-Disability Coalition (CCDC) is an organization that provides advocacy, systems navigation and methods for obtaining self-empowerment for people with disabilities.  CCDC knows that people with disabilities are able and willing to give back to their community, once empowered and provided with opportunities to do so.  CCDC provides individual advocacy services for people with all types of disabilities.  

In addition, CCDC members and volunteers provide constructive input to organizations and governmental bodies that provide services and support to the disabled community. This is done through active participation on working boards or committees.  Historically, efforts by CCDC members have provided suggestions for cost effective service delivery that actually meets the needs of those being served. CCDC is proud of proposing solutions that reduce cost while improving quality.

Because of the generous support of donors and sponsors, CCDC is able to assist individuals in situations including everything from dealing with accessing essential medical care, fighting housing discrimination, securing employment or even ensuring that a child with disabilities is not denied full access to school activities.  Everyone in America deserves the right to pursue the American Dream free of barriers.  We hope that we can count on your support to fight discrimination and to empower people, regardless of status, to pursue equal opportunity. 


PROGRAMS

Individual Advocacy

Systems Advocacy

Legal Advocacy

Training and Consulting 

 

Individual Advocacy and Volunteers – Helping Disabled People to Pursue the American Dream.

Photo of Ron H.






Ron H. – Fighting workplace bullying for himself and others

Ron H. has developmental disabilities.  He was raised by caring parents who always wanted Ron to be part of society and never allowed him to use his disabilities as an excuse and never allowed others to dismiss him.  As a result Ron has been employed for over 20 years with the same employer.  He had enjoyed continual positive evaluations and required very little support – his only accommodation need was to make sure that if an issue arose or new rules were developed, his mother was informed so she could make sure Ron understood.  With new management and a few rogue employees who were friends with the new manager some problems developed, and the disability accommodation agreement was ignored.  Ron became a victim of workplace bullying.

Ron would easily qualify for disability and most people in this situation might quit and just collect benefits, but not Ron.  He sought the assistance of CCDC and asked for help not only for him but for a few other disabled employees who were also being bullied under the new manager.  CCDC intervened and went with Ron to several meetings and helped the employer understand what was going on – exposing behavior of their employees that put them at risk in many other ways.  After an internal investigation, Ron’s claims were substantiated and he was offered a different position away from his tormentors, and the employer made significant changes in the department where the problems had occurred.  CCDC provided volunteer job coaches to help Ron learn his new job and provided the employer who is a large employer with some practical suggestions to help them avoid this kind of problem in the future. The situation concluded with the employer writing us a letter thanking us for our intervention.

 

Photo of Hope Krause










Hope Krause – Helping others in rural Colorado

Hope Krause also has cerebral palsy and grew up and continues to live in rural Colorado.    She never imagined herself working or having a professional role because it was never expected of her.  When CCDC met Hope we saw in her a great potential—it was clear that she was smart and resourceful. She had successfully raised her son as a single parent, and had managed to survive under difficult circumstances. It took only a little encouragement and some training and Hope quickly rose to become the leader of our Fort Morgan operations.  Hope has helped dozens of people with disabilities in Fort Morgan and Brush obtain needed services, and helped people get out of expensive and depressing institutional settings to live independent lives in the community.

Hope came from a large family where she used to be seen as the one in need of help not as the one to turn to when times got tough. Because of the changes in Hope and the skills she has developed, it was Hope to whom the family turned when their mother became ill with numerous medical problems including dementia.  Even though Hope cannot do physical care, she supervises the care, manages all of the medical appointments, and acts as her mother’s power of attorney.   Hope is typical of many CCDC volunteers, and exemplifies the desire of people with disabilities to have a useful role in society.

 

Photo of Ann Marie





Anne-Marie Moritsky-Martin – An Advocate who Inspires and Empowers Others

When we met Anne Marie in 2004 she shared with us ways to accommodate people with Traumatic Brain Injury.  She gave us ideas that we have now incorporated into our training that we provide to professionals.  Ideas such as providing email summaries of conversations for those with memory impairments or auditory processing deficiencies (and likewise providing verbal summaries of written information for people with visual processing deficits) have revolutionized the way we think about effective communication.  Many of the techniques that she told us would work for people with brain injury we later learned would work with many disability types including people with some types of mental illness and developmental/intellectual disabilities.

CCDC provided advocacy services to Anne Marie, but got back way more than we put in, as Anne Marie has become our lead housing advocate.  She is the thorn in the side of non compliant housing authorities and the equalizer for people with disabilities being abused by housing providers whose grasp of civil rights is weak.  In 2010 she won the Jerry Urban Memorial David & Goliath award for her willingness to fight against the big guys and win.  This award was named for Jerry Urban, who was a CCDC member known for taking on impossible adversaries and winning the old fashioned way – because he was right. She is also known for filing the occasional (ok, actually frequent) Colorado Open Records Act or Federal Freedom of Information Act requests.

Before she suffered a traumatic brain injury she was an intellectual property paralegal in Texas and learned excellent research and writing skills of the legal profession and has taken that knowledge to help people with disabilities – of course without engaging in the unauthorized practice of law! CCDC has heard from many of her clients and their works echo these sentiments written by one client “Anne Marie inspires people and shines in a world where too many people seem to not care or feel powerless to do anything to help.  She showed me how much knowledge of the rules and discovering information can help yourself as well as others.”  Another client said “When Anne Marie got involved with my case was the first time I felt supported and like I had the right to live with dignity.”

Despite all of her accomplishments professionally, the one she is most proud of is how she has raised her son Julian.  She has a lot to be proud of as Julian is a brilliant, wise, artistic, and resourceful young man with a great sense of humor. He is currently a student at the University of Colorado in Boulder.  Raising him has always been her number one priority. In addition to being a fierce advocate for social justice, she is also an artist and loves organic gardening, culinary arts, hiking, the environment, and is an animal rights activist; with a small menagerie of mostly rescued animals at her side.  

These are just three examples of how our individual Advocacy program and its volunteers help people.

In 2011 and the first half of 2012 CCDC:

  1. Provided training to thirty-one people to assist individuals in obtaining resources necessary for self-sufficiency and independence. 
  2. Developed a partnership with the University of Denver, University College for our Individual Advocacy Training.  This has helped us to expand outreach to non-disabled individuals and those associated with institutions of higher education.
  3. Provided assistance to 180 people with very diverse disabilities including but not limited to individuals with mental health illness, deafness, blindness, quadriplegia, Traumatic Brain Injury, Cerebral Palsy, Multiple Sclerosis, Down Syndrome and many more including many individuals with multiple disabilities.

Systems Advocacy – Making Government More Efficient and Effective.

Photo of Josh Winkler






Josh Winkler – An Engineer who is fixing a broken system.

Josh Winkler grew up with his family in rural Pennsylvania.  When he was seventeen, a tragic car accident left him a quadriplegic and killed his close friend.  He was flown to Craig Hospital in Colorado for rehabilitation, and like many Craig patients found his new home in Denver.  Initially, he was like many disabled people, subsisting on Social Security or SSI (74% of the poverty limit or $694 a month in 2012).  He went to college, became an engineer, and was hired by a NASCAR racing team.  He used work incentive programs as directed by Social Security and was happy to give up the cash benefit but needed to keep his Medicaid for essential quality of life care.  Despite following all of the rules, the system failed and he was forced to literally decide between work and life.  

Without Medicaid, Josh would not have funds to pay for assistance in getting in and out bed every day, and even as an engineer he could not make enough money to cover that plus all disability related expenses such as wheelchairs and medical supplies.  Consequently, he was forced to stop working for pay and has turned his attention to making the system work, not only for him, but for everyone.  Josh’s first project was to make sure that Colorado’s Medicaid Program actually works for people who want to work.  His efforts included fixing a program to help people on Medicaid like him to pay a premium on their income and get essential services necessary for daily living (getting in and out of bed, dressing, bathing, etc.).  When Medicaid implemented this program they did not include the population for whom it was actually intended, those with the more severe disabilities who need care in their home and community that is not covered by any private insurance.

Josh did research, went to every Medicaid related meeting open to the public and spoke out about the problem, and forced the state to agree to fix this egregious oversight.  Josh joined Colorado Cross-Disability Coalition (CCDC) and serves on the CCDC Board because he believes that people with all types of disabilities do better working together.  He feels that CCDC is a well respected organization that is credible in both the disability community and in governmental decision making bodies.  He also believes that CCDC is a force in making real change that improves the lives of people with disabilities.  Josh says that he still wants to go back to work and believes that disability should not preclude someone from employment, earning a living and being a productive, taxpaying citizen.

In 2011 and the first half of 2012 CCDC engaged in extensive efforts to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of government.  Our trained community leaders assist other organizations and governmental bodies to provide services intended to help the disabled community in a cost-efficient and effective manner.

Examples of involvement by current CCDC volunteers are indicated in bold, and individuals in italics, who although they may not be CCDC members, are supported and assisted as necessary in their efforts by CCDC:

Protection and Advocacy for Mentally Ill Advisory Committee –  This committee works to help people with mental illness live outside of institutions.  Currently, Colorado has dozens of people living at Fort Logan at $600 a day of state dollars who are able and willing to live in the community with supports at a fraction of the cost.  Serving on this Committee – Rolf Kotar, Amy Smith. 

CAHI  Colorado Alliance for Health and Independence –  http://www.coahi.org/  – CCDC has organizational membership and along with Family Voices has appointing authority for the board.  This organization is tasked with reducing Medicaid costs by providing appropriate care management to people with severe disabilities. Serving on this Board – Julie Reiskin. 

Participant Directed Services Policy Collaborative, formerly CDASS Advisory Committees – CCDC advocates serve in leadership of all subcommittees.  Robin Bolduc serves on administration and management, Debbie Miller and Chanda Hinton on transparency and Josh Winkler on law, Julie Farrar is co-chair and Linda Andre active on training.  This committee is active and makes policy for this program, which allows people with disabilities to receive home care services without having a government funded agency managing the care (at a 50% overhead).  This model is the long term care of the future and the only sustainable way to provide services.  

Medicaid Infrastructure Grant Steering Committee (re Medicaid Buy In) – Josh Winker and Julie Reiskin serve on this steering committee.  We have CCDC members or board members active on every committee.  This is the body that is implementing the program that will allow people with disabilities to go to work and continue to receive life sustaining health care not available in the private market.

MIG Employment Work Group – Brian Binford

MIG Buy In Design – Dawn Russell and Josh Winkler 

MIG Outreach – Louise Apodaca and Sheryle Hutter

Photo of Peter DeHaas and Heather Morrow

 

 

 

 

 

Photo of Julie Reiskin

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dual Eligible Work Group — Colorado Medicaid received a huge planning grant to figure out how to provide services to people who have Medicare and Medicaid - services  currently create barriers and waste.  CCDC took the lead on forming a dual eligible  advocates coalition.  Julie Reiskin serves on this work group and CCDC brought in a national trainer for training and education on serving dual eligible people.  Julie Reiskin also represents CCDC on national dual eligible advocates group run by the Senior Citizen Law Center.

Legal Services Corporation Board – A bipartisan national board – Julie Reiskin serves on this Board and on two committees. 

Supported Housing and Homeless Program (SHHP) is a statewide disability housing authority just started advisory committee currently served on by Julie Reiskin. 

State Independent Living Council served on by Hope Krause. 

State HAVA Committee (in Secretary of State’s office, Voter Rights).  Served on by Joe Beaver.

Emergency Preparedness  CCDC members are on several local committees and work as part of a statewide group.  Rolf Kotar and Christina Johnson board for Metro, Kristen Castor and George O’Brien serve in Southern CO.

The Legal Program – Protecting Human Rights.

Photo of Andrew Montoya

 

 

 

 

 

 

The legal program seeks enforcement of the ADA and civil rights laws coupled with education of the legal community on disability legal rights. The successes gained benefit anyone with a disability.  Recent programmatic accomplishments include; 

  • Obtained nationwide class certification and granted summary judgment in retail store wheelchair access case against Hollister Co. stores.
  • Settled case against Sheriff’s Department and city Police Department for failing to provide interpreter services for deaf inmates.
  • Resolved by consent decree a lawsuit against hospital for failing to provide interpreter services for deaf patients.
  • In litigation with two other Sheriff’s Departments for failing to provide interpreter services for deaf detainees and suit against county Department of Human Services for failing to provide interpreter services for deaf client.
  • Won summary judgment against restaurant owner for failing to alter restaurant in compliance with ADA Accessibility Standards.
  • Launched statewide investigation into Sheriff’s Department’s policies regarding providing appropriate services for deaf arrestees and inmates.

 Training and Consulting – Helping Others to Meet the Needs of the Disability Community.

Photo of Claudine McDonald

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Colorado Access is a local, nonprofit health plan that serves more than 385,000 Coloradans.  The company’s members receive healthcare under Child Health Plan Plus (CHP+), Medicaid Behavioral and Physical Health programs, or Medicare Advantage.  Colorado Access is the leading Regional Care Collaborative Organization (RCCO) under the State’s Accountable Care Collaborative Medicaid program.  Access Health Benefit Solutions also provides competitive Third Party Administrator services to employers offering customized employer-funded health insurance and wellness plans to their employees.  According to Ms. McDonald, “Colorado Access contracts with CCDC for training because we want to make sure that we provide effective, high quality customer service to the disability community and our diverse membership.”

CCDC offers an extensive training program to teach providers and government agencies how to work with clients with disabilities, provide effective communication, and comply with ADA regulations. We have developed curricula in more than 30 focus areas. We also are available for consulting where we provide expertise on focus areas relevant to the disability community such as emergency preparedness, document testing, opinion surveying, and accessibility monitoring.  We constantly provide education for the disability community and the general public by creating materials, maintaining a website and social media presence, and engaging in outreach throughout the state.  We also provide information and referral to 50-100 people each month and reach more than 500 people annually through outreach events.

In 2011 and the first half of 2012, CCDC provided training to over 300 professionals this year with positive evaluations.  Examples of trainings and speaking engagements include: 

2/10/11 GEERC Governor’s Emergency Committee –  Training comprised of health professionals who draft executive 

orders for emergency work.  Approximately fifty people were in the audience.  The result was an agreement to work on one policy change to facilitate access to medications in emergency and workgroup to help figure out what should and should not be considered “Medical” services in shelter.

3/18/11 Facilitated National Expert on Universal Designed Housing to Speak to Community.

3/24/11 Presentation about Medicaid Buy In and other Medicaid Expansion programs in Greeley, CO.

3/31/11 Presentation to SOAR workgroup on DBS progress.

4/7/11 Meet and Greet with newly appointed Office of the Governor Cabinet Members –   Presented on issues affecting the disability community to about one hundred people.

4/20/11 Training for CCDC Board of Directors –  Orientation for ten people.

4/21/11 Speaking to self help group of people with MS from CO and around the country.

5/12/11 Presentation to New Medicaid Director and Staff. 

6/10/11 Presentation at Juneteenth Event in Colorado Springs.

6/11/11 to 6/13/11   Client Impact Training by NLADA in Baltimore, MD.

6/29/11 Effective Communication for Health Care Providers – Training at Denver Foundation approximately twenty five people.

8/29/11 Presentation on Implementing Patient Centered Care at the Colorado Health Foundation. 

9/12/11 Presentation to clinical team at Children’s Hospital who work at DME Clinic.

9/18/11 Presentation to ARC National Convention –  Closing Plenary. 

10/30/11 Presentation on Disability Awareness –  Christian Education Class at University Park Church. 

11/9/11   Presentation to Regis College Social Justice Class. 

11/30/11 Presentation to NLADA Client Council. 

12/15/11 Training on how to do Medicaid appeals for parents of disabled children. 

2/14/12 Training on Basic Rights and Non-Discrimination at Court House Square.


Training by the Legal Program on “Requesting Reasonable Accommodations/ Modifications, Effective Communication and the Colorado Open Records Act.” 

4/12/12 Town Hall Presentation on Overall Medicaid and Health Care –  Colorado State Senator Irene Aguilar Town Hall.

4/12/12 and 4/24/12   Training on Disability Awareness for Colorado Access.

4/27/12 Training on Working with People with Disabilities for Rocky Mountain HMO.

4/27/12 Training on Effective Communication –  for CCDC Advocates.

5/21/12 Training on Community Organizing in Durango, CO.

6/21/12 Training on Employees Regarding Likely Questions and Disability Culture for Colorado Department of Health Care Policy and Finance for New Customer Service Employees.

6/22/12 Training on Employment Issues for Family Conference for Individuals with Skin Diseases.

6/23/12 Panel Presentation at Society for Disability Studies Closing Plenary.

6/27/12 Two Trainings for Americorps on Integrating Employees and Volunteers with Disabilities into the Workforce and an ADA Training.

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2012 CCDC Board of Directors

CCDC is fortunate to have a wide array of talented individuals from very diverse backgrounds who care deeply about Colorado’s disabled community.  Our Board includes:

Lloyd Lewis –  CCDC Board President and also the President and CEO of ARC Thrift Stores.

Christina Johnson –  CCDC Board Vice-President and Civil Rights Activist.

Gary Van Dorn –  CCDC Board Secretary and also an IRS Agent.  

Peter Konrad –  CCDC Board Treasurer and also a Nonprofit Consultant.

Brian Binford –  Board Member and an Attorney.

Lori Jones –  Board Member and also the President of Avocet Communications.

JC Lodge –  Board Member and Business Owner.

Damian Rosenburg –  Board Member and Civil Rights Activist.

Amy Smith –  Board Member and Civil Rights Activist.

James Tucker –  Board Member and Newspaper Publisher, African American Voice.

Josh Winkler –  Board Member and Small Business Owner.

More information on CCDC Board members can be found at:

http://www.ccdconline.org/about/people/board

Photo of CCDC Board Members






Community Outreach, Membership and Social Media – Staying Connected to the Disabled Community.

Photo of Jaime Lewis

 

 

 

 

 

In 2011-2012 CCDC began a comprehensive campaign to link advocates and allies in the disability community together for improved communication and enhanced impact.  Social media outreach was upgraded beyond the website and traditional e-mail member alert system to include a facebook page and twitter updates.  Membership fees were eliminated and an aggressive membership drive was initiated with the hopes of replacing fees with donations.   Jamie Lewis, CCDC’s Community Liaison continues to facilitate community events and outreach with participation in events like the ADA Celebration Picnic and Denver’s St. Patrick’s Day Parade.  Colorado has nearly 500,000 disabled individuals, CCDC strives to represent all of them and attempts to reach all of them through every means possible.   

Grants and Fundraising – 

Giving for the Greater Good.

Why my Family Gives to CCDC – 

By CCDC Board Member and Nonprofit Consultant Peter Konrad

“The Konrad Family Fund funded Colorado Cross Disability Coalition because we believe in supporting people with physical or mental challenges in their efforts to become productive, independent and contributing members of society.”

Spending on Development at CCDC accounts for 3% of our total budget.  Although this is a small part of our expenditures, it is the life blood of programs like individual advocacy where a case can easily cost over $5,000 based on our estimates.  In 2011 and the first half of 2012 we have had numerous generous sponsors – both financially and in-kind.  We have also benefitted from grants from various organizations primarily focused on providing for individual advocacy.

CCDC’s Premiere Sponsor:  Rocky Mountain Health Plans – Accountable Care Collaborative.

CCDC’s In-Kind Sponsors Include:  University of Denver – University College, Avocet Communications, Fluid Coffee Bar, Giving First, Google Apps, Google for nonprofits, Gourmet Fine Catering, Hosted Solutions, Linfocomp Tech Services, National MS Society Colorado-Wyoming Chapter, Pizza Fusion Denver, Project Fresh Kicks, Salesforce, Sector Brands, TechScouts, THE FRIEDMAN GROUP and The Gourmet Kitchen.

CCDC’s Corporate and Nonprofit Partners Include:  Arc Thrift Stores, PASCO, Fox and Robertson, Colorado Access, Rocky Mountain Human Services (formerly Denver Options), National MS Society Colorado-Wyoming Chapter, Fire on the Mountain, CHARG Resource Center, Avocet Communications, Racine’s, National Federation for the Blind, Public Consulting Group Inc., Promenja Group LLC, The Body Restore, The Independence Center, The Resource Exchange, Permobil, University Park United Methodist Church, ATG Rehab, Behavioral Healthcare Inc., Logisticare, Yellow Cab, PhRMA, Metro Taxi, Senior Housing Options, Elitch Gardens Theme Park, Johnson and Johnson, African American Voice, Freewheel Mobility, Ride Designs, ASG, JFK Partners, Colorado Coalition for the Homeless, Knight-Field-Fabry, Advocacy Denver, 5 Star Burgers, Noodles and Company, Arc of Colorado, Colorado Division of Vocational Rehabilitation, We Work for Health, Adult Care Management, Denver Center for Independent Living, Frontier Airlines, Red Mango Yogurt, VSA Colorado, Green Mountain Coffee, Nepotisms Trading Post, The Legal Center for People with Disabilities and Older People, Mountain View Dental, Denver Regional Mobility and Access Council.  

CCDC’s Foundation and Grant Supporters Include:  The Anschutz Foundation, The Anna and John J. Sie Foundation The Colorado Trust, Colorado Commission for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing, Petra Fund, Colorado Bar Association, The Konrad Family Fund, Colorado Health Foundation, Caring for Colorado, GivingFirst, Christopher and Dana Reeve Foundation, The Anschutz Family Foundation, The Denver Foundation and The Jay and Rose Phillips Family Foundation of Colorado. 

CCDC 2012 Annual Awards Ceremony

Photo of wheelchair ramp at Highland Cork

 

 

 

 

 

Honoring those who go “Above and Beyond” the Disability Community

On the Anniversary of the signing of the Americans with Disabilities Act, The Colorado Cross-Disability Coalition (CCDC) honored seven organizations and/or individuals for their exemplary “Above and Beyond” efforts in working for, and with the disability community.  Award Recipients include:

Legislator of the Year – State Representative Dave Young, Weld County

Nonprofit of the Year – National Jewish Health, Colorado 

Government Employee of the Year – Joseph Kiolbasa, City Manager for the City of Sterling

Nonprofit Professional of the Year – Diane Armijo-Moore, Pueblo, Coordinator for Adult Resources for Caring and Help (ARCH)

Cultural Venues Accessibility Champion of the Year – Barry Sweet, Backcountry Office Manager, 

Rocky Mountain National Park

Emergency Preparedness Professional of the Year – Dave Schaad, Disabilities Integration Specialist FEMA, Region VIII

Small Business of the Year – Highland Cork and Café, Northwest Denver

 

Awardees will be honored at the CCDC Annual Awards Ceremony this Fall.

 

CCDC’s Financial Activity for the most recent fiscal year (2011):

COLORADO CROSS-DISABILITY COALITION
Statement of Activities
Year Ended December 31, 2011

 

Revenue Gains and Other Support

Program fees and settlement revenues
Unrestricted
$413,681
Temporarily Restricted
N/A
Total
$413,681

Foundation contributions
Unrestricted
$122,000
Temporarily Restricted
N/A
Total
$122,000

Corporate and individual contributions
Unrestricted
$29,079
Temporarily Restricted
N/A
Total
$29,079

Fundraising event revenues
$20,079
Temporarily Restricted
N/A
Total
$20,079

Other
$152
Temporarily Restricted
N/A
Total
$152

In-Kind
Unrestricted
$136,295
Temporarily Restricted
N/A
Total
$136,295

Released from Restrictions
Unrestricted
$4000
Temporarily Restricted
($4000)
Total
N/A

Total Revenue, Gains, and Other Support
Unrestricted
$725,936
Temporarily Restricted
($4000)
Total
$721,936

EXPENSES
Program Services
Advocacy
Unrestricted
$268,332
Temporarily Restricted
N/A
Unrestricted
Total

Legal
Unrestricted
$227,418
Temporarily Restricted
N/A
Total
$227,418

Outreach
Unrestricted
$32,101
Temporarily Restricted
N/A
Total
$32,101

Total Program Services
Unrestricted
$527,851
Temporarily Restricted
N/A
Total
$527,851

Supporting Services
Management and general
Unrestricted
$60,906
Temporarily Restricted
N/A
Total
$60,906

Fund-raising
Unrestricted
$13,779
Temporarily Restricted
N/A
Total
$13,779

Total Supporting Services
Unrestricted
$74,685
Temporarily Restricted
N/A
Total
$74,685

Total Expenses
Unrestricted
$602,536
Temporarily Restricted
N/A
Total
$602,536

Change in Net Assets
Unrestricted
$123,400
Temporarily Restricted
($4000)
Total
$119,400

NET ASSETS, Beginning of Year
Unrestricted
($17,304)
Restricted
$4000
Total
($13,304)

NET ASSETS, End of Year
Unrestricted
$106,096
Restricted
N/A
Total
$106,096

How you can help Colorado Cross-Disability Coalition (CCDC) Advocate for the Disabled Community

CCDC offers a variety of methods for helping people with all types of disabilities to have equal access to the American Dream.  One way to help is to become an Advocate.  Advocates assist people in systems navigation and self empowerment.  Training to become an advocate is free, you are just required to advocate for yourself and others.  If you would like to become an Advocate, please contact  Advocacy Coordinator Peter DeHaas at 303-839-1775.  

Another way to help is through giving.  CCDC accepts financial and in-kind donations.  Our in-kind wish list includes anything that helps us to help others including website design, office supplies and much more!  If you would like to make a donation please contact our Development Coordinator Jerry Frangas at 303-931-1681.

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